Binders 101

Last night I was alerted to this great site about binders. For those of you who don’t know, a binder is pretty much anything someone uses to make their chest look more flat. They can be pretty important for transmasculine people, especially those who want to be read as men (on the street for instance), and just for their self-image.¬† But all manner of people wear them. For example, they are popular among cis lesbian women.

not this kind of binder

This site is a great resource for people who have questions about binders–you can ask them for advice, or read through the site to see what they’ve said to other people who have asked them things. They have links to sites where you can buy binders, and I believe they are collecting reviews on binders from them.

there you go

Having resources like this is really important because there is some controversy about binding–if done incorrectly, it can have some pretty nasty consequences (you can read about it here). Binders aren’t the cheapest breast-holding devices out there, but if you can find something that other people can vouch for, it’ll probably end up being cheaper than a doctor’s bill.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Dear Trans 101

Hi! I hope some of you who were there are now checking out this site. I am just writing the world cause I think they should know we had an awesome discussion and I’m so glad to have such awesome fellow transfabulous people in my community.

Rock on!

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Genderf*ck Outfit, Planned!

It’s gonna look a little somethin’ like this.

You should be planning your outfits too, cause Genderf*ck (the * in this case stands for u) is coming this Saturday! Check out the facebook even page here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Happy National Coming Out Day!

In honor of National Coming Out Day, let’s all check out this fabulous video about coming out at the intersection of race, immigration rights, and gender.

via

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Nice, California!

A couple of supersweet family members of mine alerted me to some great legislation being passed on the sunny side of America.

Two bills, the The Vital Statistics Modernization Act and the Gender Nondiscrimination Act, were signed into law by the governor yesterday. The first “streamlines the current process for trans people to receive a new birth certificate (or other identifying documentation) that reflects their current gender. Trans people must only provide medical documentation from an attending physician to prove that they have undergone ‘clinically appropriate treatment.'” Hopefully, under the new Standards of Care, this might mean none at all? Fingers crossed, everybody.

The second “bulks up employment, housing and other civil rights protections for all Californians, but especially for trans people.”

I’m really excited about this, not just because it means better lives for a lot of our friends out west, but also because it means that these important measures aren’t being lost in the very loud and very shiny battle for gay marriage.

via

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

She’s A Boy I Knew

!!!!!!!!!!!

Check out this boss trailer for a new documentary by and about a trans lesbian and her experience with transition and family. I especially love that she conducts the interviews herself, so that the interviewees address the camera as ‘you.’ Instead of objectifying trans women like so many films do, this one invites you to directly identify with her. Just amazing.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Standards of Care

Finally, some good news!

This fab article from Autostraddle documents their trans* correspondents’ experience with the Standards of Care, unofficial guidelines that doctors have been following since the 70’s as if it were the Bible of trans* care. Unfortunately, it pathologized trans* people, set doctors up as gatekeepers to medical transition, made access to care even more prohibitively expensive, and completely excluded gender non-conforming and queer trans* people.

It doesn’t get updated very often, and so the 6th version, released in 2001, still had all of these problems. I was feeling pretty sad at the middle of this article, when it did a 180 and told me that the 7th version of Standards of Care came out, and it’s much improved!

Now it’s called “The Standards of Care for the Health of Transsexual, Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People,” moves away from talking about pathologization, doesn’t suggest huge, expensive tracts of therapy or unrealistic time “passing” as, um, the gender you really are. Instead it stresses the responsibilities of health providers and informed consent.

Nothing like  bit of trans*-friendly good news over coffee. What a way to start your day!

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized